Text Size:

Current Size: 100%

Blind and Deaf Consumer Preferences for Android and iOS Smartphones

Wireless RERC researchers John Morris, PhD and Jim Mueller authored a book chapter titled Blind and Deaf Consumer Preferences for Android and iOS Smartphones, to be published by Springer London in Inclusive Designing: Joining Usability, Accessibility, and Inclusion. The abstract for their chapter follows:  Access to and use of mobile wireless technology has become critical to social and economic participation for people with disabilities. As the technology increases in power and sophistication, these customers increasingly rely on mobile devices and software for functions previously available only through dedicated “assistive technology.” Successfully serving this large and growing population has become a market imperative as well as a legislative mandate for the wireless industry in the US.  Competition for this market is especially keen between the Android and Apple’s iOS operating systems.  This article presents survey research findings on the relative ease of use, importance, and satisfaction observed by blind and deaf customers using mobile devices on Android or iOS platforms. Focus group research conducted by the authors suggests that blind smartphone users overwhelmingly favor the iPhone, while deaf smartphone users show greater diversity in their device choices.  Data collected through the Survey of User Needs (SUN) conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC) are presented to test this finding with quantitative data, and to test differences between blind and deaf users in terms of ease of use and satisfaction with iPhone and Android smartphones.

Additional Information

Tags

  • National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research logo
  • Center for Advanced Communications Policy logo
  • Georgia Institute of Technology logo
  •  Shepherd Center Logo

500 10th Street NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0620 | 404-3854614 | Contact Us

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies is sponsored by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under grant number 90RE5007-01-00. The opinions contained in this website are those of the Wireless RERC and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or NIDILRR.