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Seeking People who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing for Usability Study in Atlanta

A usability study will be held at the Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access (CATEA).  We will be asking for feedback on several different light, vibration and sound signals for receiving emergency messages on cell phones. 

The study will take about one hour and participants will be compensated $40 cash for their time and opinions.  It is currently scheduled for:

Wireless RERC on the Record - Hearing Aid Compatibility Regulations

The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), in collaboration with Georgia Tech’s Center for Advanced Communications Policy (CACP), submitted comments in response to the FCC’s Public Notice, Request for Updated Information And Comment On Wireless Hearing Aid Compatibility (HAC) Regulations [WT Docket Nos. 07-250 and 10-254].

FCC Extends Comment Dates for Wireless Hearing Aid Compatibility Regulations Information

February 2015 – The FCC released a notice [47 CFR Part 20] correcting errors found in their December 23rd request for updated information to assess whether current hearing aid compatibility rules for wireless handsets effectively address the needs of people who are Deaf and hard of hearing.

Accessibility of Wireless Emergency Alerts

We need your help to make emergency alerts and warning systems accessible to people with disabilities.  Alerts and warning messages are critical during emergencies. People with disabilities are sometimes not considered when sending alerts and warnings. This can impact how you prepare, respond and get back to normal life. We invite you to discuss how you are alerted and respond to emergency alerts, the vibration and light features of assistive technologies and mobile phones. We seek individuals who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing.

Georgia Tech Seeks Focus Group Participants for Emergency Alerts Research

October 2014 – In research funded by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate, Georgia Tech is holding focus groups to discuss assistive technology features, mobile devices, and how people with disabilities respond and are alerted of emergencies. Because different disability types aren’t always considered in the design of alerting systems, this cycle of research is seeking feedback from individuals who are Deaf or hard-of-hearing.

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The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies is sponsored by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under grant number 90RE5007-01-00. The opinions contained in this website are those of the Wireless RERC and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or NIDILRR.