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IDEAL Currency Identifier

On October 9, 2012, the Department of Education announced the launch of IDEAL Currency Identifier, a free downloadable application (app) designed to assist individuals who are blind or visually impaired to denominate U.S. currency on  Android mobile devices.    IDEAL Currency Identifier was developed by IDEAL Group, IQ Engines, and the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's App Factory.  The IDEAL Currency Identifier initiative supports the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) mandate to provide increased access to US currency for persons who are blind and visually impaired.

IDEAL Currency Identifier  handles three generations of U.S. currency notes beginning in 1993 and is compatible with Android 4.0 or higher devices with rear-facing cameras.

The app can be downloaded for free to more than 1,250 different wireless devices.   Android-based devices are produced by 48 manufacturers and distributed by 60 wireless service providers, in 136 countries.  It was developed by Apps4Android, Inc., a subsidiary of IDEAL Group that focuses on developing accessible mobile applications.

Dr. Charlie Lakin, the Director of NIDRR, issued the following statement: “Through our dialogue with the BEP, a special opportunity emerged to fulfill our mission in support of persons who are blind and visually impaired.  IDEAL Currency Identifier uses advanced image recognition technology to read a note and, in a matter of seconds, provide users with an audible response indicating the note’s denomination.“

Download IDEAL Currency Identifier from Google Play

Department of Education Press Release

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The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies is sponsored by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under grant number 90RE5007-01-00. The opinions contained in this website are those of the Wireless RERC and do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or NIDILRR.